There are numerous art forms in India that are on the verge of being forgotten. The Legacy Project is a venture by Seagram’s 100 Pipers to bring these dying art forms back into the spotlight. It provides a platform to artists and their art and showcases them to the world. An initiative that springs from the very philosophy of the brand – ‘Be Remembered For Good.’

Five artforms from different parts of India have been adorned on the Seagram’s 100 Pipers packaging. These are new pieces of work that have been created for the sole purpose of this project. Each piece is a reflection of the artist’s version of what goodness means to them.

Phulkari Embroidery

01

Gara Embroidery

02

Bengal Weave

03

Kalamkari

04

Maheshwari

05

Phulkari Embroidery

Phulkari, a rural tradition of handmade embroidery, literally meaning flower work, came into being by the women from the Punjab region during the 19th century. Its main characteristic was the use of the darn stitch using a colourful thread on the coarse side of a piece of cotton cloth.


Food For Thought

Wheat flowers have been embroidered by the artist in this piece. The region was predominantly into farming and so the artist has paid homage to the farmers who have fed society and nurtured it. Providing people with the most important thing to survive - food. That is what goodness means to the artist.


Additional info

This piece has been curated by Kirandeep Kaur and Harinder Singh. They have been steering the revival of this art form for almost two decades. Today, they have not only sensitized the audience to the story of Phulkari but have mobilised the rural women of Punjab towards progress and self-reliance which will help take the art form forward and ensure its longevity.

Gara Embroidery

Born in central Asia, this art form found its way into India in the 8thcentury. This needlepoint technique involves creating a riot of colours on fabric with nature inspired motifs like flowers, creepers and birds. The designs are intricate and take anywhere between three weeks to nine months to complete.


Home Clean Home

The artist has created a scene that resides underwater. Marine life is shown in full bloom with all creatures living in peace, harmony and most importantly without any pollution. That is the meaning of goodness for the artist.


Additional info

This piece has been created by Zenobia who has been practicing this art form for several years. Today, she is regularly conducting workshops to impart this useful skill in various schools and colleges. She has also held exhibitions in museums in India and abroad to spread the word about this art form and ensure its survival.

Bengal Weave

This weave gets its name from the village it was born in, Dhaniakhali. A village nestled in the Hooghly district of West Bengal with the origins of the weave dating back to 1935. A time when Dhaniakhali was on its way to becoming a fertile ground of handloom textiles.


March On

This piece is a reflection of life. The yellow colour symbolises positivity and the geometric designs are an analogy of the ups and downs one goes through in life. The artist believes that no matter what life throws at you, always embrace it with positivity. That's the meaning of goodness for the artist.


Behind The Artwork

This piece has been curated by Bappaditya Biswas, winner of the UNESCO Seal of Excellence. He strives to bring about a change in the local weaving community and spends time with the weavers in their looms, works with them and also shows them contemporary designs which can be weaved in traditional forms. The idea being to help weavers create products that people love to buy and turn them into entrepreneurs.

Kalamkari

Kalamkari is a type of hand-painted or block-printed cotton textile from the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. Only natural dyes are used in Kalamkari. The minute details in the work are brought to life with a ‘kalam' or pen. The kalam is used to draw or fill colours in freehand, making the piece completely hand crafted.


One For All

This piece brings alive the tree of life. The one source that provides to all in the animal kingdom, without discrimination. The artist wishes humanity to follow this path as well. This is what goodness means to the artist.


Behind The Artwork

This piece has been created by Mamta Reddy, who is an award-winning artist known for her free hand Kalamkari drawings on woven fabric. She has set up The Kalam Creations Artisans society that supports the livelihood of many families in Tirupati & trains underprivileged women in the artform.

Maheshwari

Though the tradition of weaving in the ancient temple town of Maheshwar dates back to the 5th century, it was popularised during the reign of Maratha queen Rani Ahilyabai Holkar (1767-1795). She invited master weavers from Surat and South India to create traditional Nauvari or Maharashtrian-style nine-yard saris, and turbans—giving them as gifts to visiting royals. This weaving tradition was reignited when Sally Holkar worked with the weavers in the region to incorporate contemporary designs, thereby preventing these weaving traditions from disappearing altogether.


Limitless

The design is a reflection of what humanity should be. The artist has seamlessly interwoven the checks of a Scottish kilt with the checks of a Maheshwari weave. It shows an existence without borders and that is the definition of goodness for the artist.


Behind The Artwork

This piece has been curated by Sally Holkar. She is the force behind WomenWeave, which revived the Maheshwari weave and brought it to the forefront of Madhya Pradesh’s handloom traditions. This endeavour spurred the growth of the local textile industry and turned the Maheshwari sari into a popular form of handloom.